Why is it Not Okay to be White?Featured video

admin
Sorry, only registred users can create playlists.

Published by Admin in FKN News White Genocide WN

8 Views

Description

IN MY OPINION, THIS VIDEO MAY HAVE BEEN DONE BY A BALTIMORE HALF, QUARTER OR FULL JEWESS.  THE BIT ABOUT MOST OR ALL OF HER FRIENDS BEING BALTIMORE BLACK WOMEN IS TOO OVER THE TOP.

What the heck is white g*enocide? Oh, gee, Rick, that's a big bag naughty term isn't it!? That's precisely why we need to talk about it, thus, today I am talking about it. I also address the recent "It's Okay to be White" campaign.

You can gib shekels on Patreon:
patreon.com/AydinPaladin

Links:
https://goo.gl/XRzS1z
https://goo.gl/6dPrJM
https://goo.gl/8R2Lea
https://goo.gl/rY2vgB
https://goo.gl/CNZnwc
https://goo.gl/aMtJXY
https://goo.gl/iNyaJQ
https://goo.gl/cdEMYh
https://goo.gl/QiJXB2
https://goo.gl/JHoS1C
https://goo.gl/TSh4Dw
https://goo.gl/WSSKTm
https://goo.gl/mFS2nD
https://goo.gl/p6hcxh
https://goo.gl/nJckR9

References:
Allport, G. (1954). The nature of prejudice. Garden City, NJ Anchor.
Bergsieker, H. B., Shelton, J. N., & Richeson, J. A. (2010). To be liked versus respected: Divergent goals in interracial interactions. Journal of personality and social psychology, 99(2), 248.
Burton, C. M., Plaks, J. E., & Peterson, J. B. (2015). Why do conservatives report being happier than liberals? The contribution of neuroticism. Journal of Social and Political Psychology, 3(1), 89-102.
Butz, D. A., & Plant, E. A. (2009). Prejudice control and interracial relations: The role of motivation to respond without prejudice. Journal of Personality, 77, 1311-1342.
Burton, C. M., Plaks, J. E., & Peterson, J. B. (2015). Why do conservatives report being happier than liberals? The contribution of neuroticism. Journal of Social and Political Psychology, 3(1), 89-102.
Carver, C. S., Glass, D. C., & Katz, I. (1978). Favorable evaluations of Blacks and the handicapped: Positive prejudice, unconscious denial, or social desirability?. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 8(2), 97-106.
Devine, P. G., Plant, E. A., Amodio, D. M., Harmon-Jones, E., & Vance, S. L. (2002). The regulation of explicit and implicit race bias: The role of motivations to respond without prejudice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 835–848
Dovidio, J. F., Gaertner, S. L., & Saguy, T. (2007). Another view of “we”: Majority and minority group perspectives on a common ingroup identity. In W. Stoebe & M. Hewstone (Eds.), European review of social psychology (Vol. 18, pp. 296–330). Hove, United Kingdom: Psychology Press
Dovidio, J. F., Gaertner, S. L., & Johnson, J. D. (1999). New directions in prejudice and prejudice reduction: The role of cognitive representations and affect. In annual meeting of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, St. Louis, MO.
interracial interaction. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 62-68.
Dutton, D. G. (1971). Reactions of restaurateurs to blacks and whites violating restaurant dress regulations. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, 3, 298.
Dutton, D. G. (1973). The relationship of amount of perceived discrimination toward minority
group on behaviour of majority group members. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, 5, 34-45.
Gaertner, S. L., Dovidio, J. F., Anastasio, P. A., Bachman, B. A., & Rust, M. C. (1993). The Common Ingroup Identity Model: Recategorization and the reduction of intergroup Bias. European Review of Social Psychology, 4, 1-26.
Goffman, E. (1964). Stigma: Notes on the management of spoiled identity. Simon and Schuster.
Graham, J., Haidt, J., & Nosek, B. A. (2009). Liberals and conservatives rely on different sets of moral foundations. Journal of personality and social psychology, 96(5), 1029.
Major, B., & O‟Brien, L. T. (2005). The social psychology of stigma. Annual Review of Psychology, 56, 393-421.
Norton, M. I., Dunn, E. W., Carney, D. R., & Ariely, D. (2012). The persuasive “power” of stigma?. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 117(2), 261-268.
Plant, E. A., Devine, P. G., & Brazy, P. C. (2003). The bogus pipeline and motivations to respond without prejudice: Revisiting the fading and faking of racial prejudice. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 6(2), 187-200.
Plant, E. A., & Devine, P. G. (1998). Internal and external motivation to respond without prejudice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75, 811-832.
Saguy, T., Tausch, N., Dovidio, J. F., & Pratto, F. (2009). The irony of harmony: Intergroup contact can produce false expectations for equality. Psychological Science, 20, 114–121
Schneider, M. E., Major, B., Luhtanen, R., & Crocker, J. (1996). When help hurts: Social stigma and the costs of assumptive help. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 22, 201–
209.
Tajfel, H., & Turner, J. C. (1979). An integrative theory of intergroup conflict. The social psychology of intergroup relations?, 33, 47.
Talaska, C. A., Fiske, S. T., & Chaiken, S. (2008). Legitimating racial discrimination: Emotions, not beliefs, best predict discrimination in a meta-analysis. Social justice research, 21(3), 263-296.

BG Music:
https://www.audiotool.com/track/zzzzzzzx/

Post your comment

Be the first to comment